Apprenticeship Programs

If you would like to find out more about this opportunity,
please call Tammy Marcase at 843-3891.

HVAC
Course Outline: Fundamentals of the design and installation of heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) systems. Topics include: basic calculation of heating and cooling loads, warm air-duct heating systems, commercial air-conditioning systems, air handling and duct system design.

Fabrication I
Course Outline: Students will demonstrate skills which correspond with the following list. Understanding of the course material and transferring it to on- the-job tasks is the final objective. Course Content: Parallel-sided solids, Units of measure for volume, Volumes: the cube, the square prism, and rectangular solids, Volumes of cylindrical, semicircular-sided and spherical-ended solids, Volumes of cones and pyramids, Allowances for edges, Allowances for seams, Stretch outs of square pipes, Stretch outs of rectangular pipes, Stretch outs for Circular Jobs, Stretch outs for semicircular-sided jobs, Stretch outs of boxes, Number of pieces from a sheet, Length of Wire for edges of jobs, Length of arcs of circles, Description of tapered solids, Law of right triangles, Roof Pitches, Bend Allowances, Surface Speeds of Rotating Cylinders, Introduction to Trigonometry, Using the Tangent Formula, Using the Sine Formula, Using the Cosine Formulas, Selection of Formulas, On-the-Job Applications, Bend Allowances of angles, Bend Deduction, Print Reading, Triangular trig and bend deduction.

Fabrication II
Course Outline: Students will demonstrate skills which correspond with the following list. Understanding of the course material and transferring it to on- the-job tasks is the final objective. Course content: Descriptions of Tapered Solids, Stretch out of Cones, Selection of Formulas, Shear Sizes, Blueprint Reading 23-1, Read print and layout angle box, Blueprint Reading 23-2, Shear Sizes, Blueprint Reading 23-3, Shear sizes angles, Blueprint Reading, Multizone Ventilation Systems, Blueprint Reading Unit 32 a Motel Air-conditioning System, Trig length for compound angles, Blueprint Reading Unit 33 Exhaust Systems, Description of Tapered Solids, Stretch-outs of Cones, Selection of Formulas, Shear Sizes, Blueprint Reading, Read Print and Layout angle box, Blueprint reading 23-2, Shear Sizes, Blueprint reading 23-3, Shear sizes angles, Circumference of a circle, Trig length for guard and hinge, Trig lengths for Compound angles, The circle, The units of angular measure, The protractor.

Facilities Electrical
Course Outline: Introduction to the design of electrical systems for residential and commercial structures. Topics include: single phase and three phase power, voltage selection, branch and feeder circuit design and calculations, transformer and panelboard design, building load analysis, motor feeder calculation, power factor correction, and lighting fundamentals.

Facilities Mechanical
Course Outline: This course provides the student with an understanding of facilities-related mechanical systems within an industrial complex. Included in the topics for discussion are plumbing, heating, ventilation, and air conditioning, flow pressures and gages, air systems, sprinkler systems and fire safety, ductwork, and fire control, conveyance equipment and parts transfer systems, and the associated overall preventive maintenance methods.

Mechanical Systems I
Course Outline: This course provides an introduction to mechanical systems. Topics for detailed discussion include belts, chains, shafts, couplings, clutches/brakes, bearings and seals.

Mechanical Systems II
Course Outline: This second-level course provides a detailed description of mechanical systems theory, advancing the students’ understanding of the proper application and selection of the specific mechanical systems introduced in the Mechanical Systems I course.

Rigging
Course Outline:

Industrial Controls 101
Course Outline: Course Description: This is designed for entry level electricians & mechanics. This 30-hour course will introduce electricians to control technology and teach them troubleshooting techniques. Each student will wire several industrial control circuits employing motor starters and relays. They will test and troubleshoot their panels. Prerequisite: Students should have a sound understanding of electrical fundamentals such as: Understanding current flow, terms and their unit of measurement, amps, volts, and ohms. Basic Understanding of Electromagnets. Learner Outcomes: 1. Given a wiring diagram, panel switches and wire, the student will wire a lamp to be controlled from three locations. 2. The student will be given a relay and will demonstrate his ability to rebuild it. 3. Given an Allen-Bradley Motor Starter the student will disassemble and rebuild the starter. 4. The student will be introduced to the operation and wiring of control devices. The student will design and draw an industrial control circuit. 5. Using the concepts of basic undervoltage circuit design, the student will design and draw a motor control circuit. 6. The student will be able to design a control circuit from a functional specification and wire a panel using the design. 7. The student will be able to write a functional specification for a circuit design. 8. The student will demonstrate their knowledge of reversing starters by designing several control circuits. 9. The student will demonstrate a complete understanding of master undervoltage circuits by designing a circuit. 10. The student will be able to relate interlock protection to four way, three position valves. 11. The student will be introduced to powerful troubleshooting techniques and will use these techniques to troubleshoot a circuit that they have designed and wired on a test panel.

Shop Practices Part 2
Course Outline: See Shop Practices Part 1

In-Process Sensors
Course Outline: Part One: Basic AC and DC Electricity
This includes 9 hours of AC and DC voltage training with demonstrations with hands on applications. (Depends on equipment availability).
    Subjects will include, but not limited to;
  • 1. Introduction to Voltage, Current, and Resistance.
  • 2. What is AC voltage? Where does it come from? Why do we use it? Where do we use it? What personal protective equipment is needed?
  • 3. What is DC voltage? Where does it come from? Why do we use it? Where do we use it? What personal protective equipment is needed?
  • 4. Understand and using Ohms Law (basic).


Part Two: Various Sensing Devises
The Sensor program is 30 hours in length, covering AC and DC Sensors, which includes both 2 wire and 3 wire solid state sensing devises. It includes theory and hands on projects to reinforce material taught (depends on equipment availability) and includes student tests.
    Subjects will include, but not limited to:
  • 1. Scanning techniques, modulated and un-modulated light, response time, sensitivity adjustment, dark-operated/light- operated, height and distance.
  • 2. Emphasis will be placed on the understanding of DC polarity as applied to sensing devices and wire color identifications.
  • 3. Proper installation.
  • 4. Troubleshooting and testing sensors.
  • 5. Applications.

Electromechanical Problem Solving
Course Outline:

Print Reading/Basic Math
Course Outline: This course will introduce and/or refresh the student in Blueprint Reading, Line Interpretation, Print Terminology, with a Basic understanding of the Four Geometric Form Control Principles; Straightness, Flatness, Parallelism, and Perpendicularity, Title Block Information, Block Tolerances, General and Local Notes, Types of Dimensioning and Dimensions, effects of Tolerance Accumulation, and Datum selection. This standard course will not cover Geometric Dimensioning and Tolerancing, Welding, Machining Practices, unless requested by the client. Upon completion of this course the student will be able to: 1. Understand Orthographic Projections, Alphabet of lines, and Matrices. 2. Be familiar with Features, Types of Dimensions. 3. Know Units of Measurement and Types of Tolerances. 4. Understand Different Views and Structures. 5. Be familiar with Bill of Material Relationship to Drawing Views.
This class will run on Tuesdays and Thursdays.

Geomtric Dimensioning and Tolerancing (G,D & T)
Course Outline: This course is a study of the geometric controls set forth in ASME standard Y14.5M-1994 - Dimensioning and Tolerancing. Upon completion of the course the student will demonstrate a beginners-level ability to interpret a symbolic language used on engineering drawings to communicate geometric information.
This class will run on Tuesdays and Thursdays.

Shop Math III
Course Outline: Advanced trigonometry.
This class will run on Monday and Wednesdays.

Shop Math IV
Course Outline: This course is designed to develop in the student a thorough understanding and working knowledge of the various formulas and charts in the text (Machinery’s Handbook) as applied to the basic machine shop practices. Upon completion of this course the student should be able to: 1. Identify and solve various formulas and equations useful in everyday shop practice. 2. Identify and use the basic charts and graphs found in the text, (Machinery’s Handbook), to aid in the machining process.
This class will run on Mondays and Wednesdays.

* NOTE: Course titles, costs, length and vendor are presented for planning purposes only and are subject to change.